Getting it straight: glue stick block piecing {the complete glue-torial}

 

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It’s been forever since my last post… is this thing still on???

Hope everyone is having a fantastic 2017 so far! I just started working on my very first quilt project of the year and figured what better way to start the year off, then to share one of my most favorite sewing related tips?!

I’m sure, with you guys being such an amazingly talented crafty bunch, you already know about the many wonders of le glue stick. I mean, it’s pretty much just one notch down from the hot glue gun (srsly, everyone knows that’s the best invention ever). BUT did you know you can use a glue stick to help with piecing together your quilt blocks?

In this quick glue-torial, I’m going to show you how to get crisp, near perfect seams using a glue stick… a method that will most definitely help you to de-wonkify your quilt blocks!

Best type of glue stick?

There are sooo many different types of glue sticks to choose from. How do you know which one is best? Well, how the heck would I know (what do I look like… a glue expert)? 😂Honestly, I say just find the one that works best for you. My personal favorite is the UHU Stic. It’s solvent free, made from 98% natural ingredients and is completely washable. It’s a little more watery than Elmer’s, making it glide smoother when applied. –It also doesn’t get as gloopy and won’t dry out on your fabric before you get your pieces together.

Note: I just discovered UHU also makes a more eco-friendly glue stick called the UHU Stic ReNATURE, which is the same formula as the original, but the container is made from 58% plant-based raw materials (reducing your carbon footprint). I’ll be looking for that one from now on.

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The great glue how-to:

Note: the sawtooth star was not glue-pieced… as much as I wish it were. So, pay no mind to the experimental hot mess in the pictures below. I only used this technique to add the border. 😉

Step 1: Rummage through your recycle bin for something to lay your fabric on top of to protect your workspace. I keep a clean pizza box lid at my station and it works perfectly!

Step 2: Apply the glue in a light swiping motion to the outer edge of your fabric. Try to keep it within your seam allowance, especially on darker fabrics if you don’t plan on washing.

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Step 3: This is very important! Place your fabric pieces together and press with a hot iron (I also use steam out of habit, but I don’t think it’s necessary). The heat dries the glue instantly, so it doesn’t make your fabric slide around and won’t muck up your needle when sewing.

Step 4: Sew your pieces together as normal.

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Step 5: finger-press open your new seam. If there are areas where the pieces are stuck together from the glue going outside your seam allowance, just gently pull apart.

Step 6: Give a final press with your iron, step back and admire your gorgeous handiwork!

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But what about the plastic waste?

 

You know I like to practice sustainability wherever I can. Luckily, these guys are available in pretty large sized tubes, so I see them lasting a fairly long time. Be aware – even though the package says the container is recyclable, they can only be recycled at designated recycling facilities.

Fortunately, while reading up on how to recycle glue sticks, I found out that Elmer’s has actually partnered up with Walmart and Terracycle to provide glue stick and bottle recycling services – and they accept all glue brands! You can visit the Elmer’s Glue Crew website for more info on how the program works and how you can get your child’s school involved! Who knew? 🤗

Don’t forget, you can always upcycle those little nuggets too!

Recycling is definitely a great option, but why not try to reuse when possible, right??? I found several tutorials online for turning your empty glue stick containers into chunky crayon holders and to be honest, I’m pretty excited to try it out! You just melt down all those infinite amounts of broken crayons before they end up in your dryer (I know all you parents out there feel me) and pour them into your clean tube. MAGICAL!!

Do you know of any other clever ways to use glue sticks or reuse glue stick containers? Would love to hear your ideas!

xo.a

 

Linking up with Yvonne at Quilting Jetgirl for Tips and Tutorials Tuesday!

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6 thoughts on “Getting it straight: glue stick block piecing {the complete glue-torial}

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